Home News Current Champs WAIL! Encyclopedia
The Cyber Boxing Zone Message Board
+ Reply to Thread
Results 1 to 16 of 16

Thread: R.I.P - Jose Torres

  1. #1
    Registered User
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Location
    Lodi, New Jersey
    Posts
    294
    vCash
    500

    R.I.P - Jose Torres

    It is with Great sadness that I again have to inform you of the passing of another Great Champion. Jose Torres, the former Light Heavyweight Champion of the World died this morning @ 4:00 AM in Puerto Rico were he was living the past 3 years or so.

    Jose Torres is boxing's renaissance man: olympian, world champion, author, administrator and now Hall-of-Famer.

    Like many successful amateur fighters, Jose began fighting when he joined the U.S. Army at the age of 18. From the Army, he represented the United States in the 1956 Olympics and won a silver medal in the light middleweight division.


    Like many Olympic medalists, Torres went on to have a brilliant pro career.


    Torres turned pro in 1958 and quickly established himself as a contender when he battled future welterweight king Benny Paret to a 10-round draw. As a middleweight he beat contenders Randy Sandy, Don Fullmer, Jose Gonzalez and Wilburt McClure.


    In 1965, Torres stopped Willie Pastrano at Madison Square Garden to become light heavyweight champion of the world. Then, four months later, he won a non-title bout over Tom McNeeley, who once challenged for the heavyweight title.


    Torres made three successful title defenses in 1966, defeating Wayne Thornton, Eddie Cotton and Chic Calderwood. But in December of '66, Torres lost the crown to former middleweight king Dick Tiger on a close decision.


    They fought again six months later and Torres lost a split decision. Torres fought once in 1968, knocking out Bob Dunlop and once in 1969, climbing off the canvas to stop Charlie "The Devil" Green. That was his last fight.


    Torres has remained part of boxing although his fighting days ended. He authored a pair of biographies, "Sting Like a Bee" on Muhammad Ali and "Fire and Fear" on Mike Tyson. From 1983 to 1988 he served as chairman of the New York State Boxing Commission and is currently a presiding supervisor for the WBO.

    He was also Inducted into the New Jersey Boxing Hall of Fame on November 18, 2004.

    Also, another bio is on the following web site:

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jose_Torres

    Thanks once again, Henry
    Last edited by hhascup; 01-19-2009 at 02:24 PM.

  2. #2
    Registered User
    Join Date
    Mar 2006
    Posts
    670
    vCash
    500

    Re: R.I.P - Jose Torres

    Puerto Rican boxer Jose Torres dies at 72
    46 minutes ago

    PONCE, Puerto Rico (AP) — Former light heavyweight champion Jose Torres has died in his native Puerto Rico. He was 72.

    His widow, Ramonita Ortiz, says Torres died Monday of a heart attack.

    Torres won the world light heavyweight title in 1965 by beating Willie Pastrano at Madison Square Garden in New York. He made three title defenses before losing to Dick Tiger in 1966.

    Torres began fighting when he joined the U.S. Army as a teenager, and won a silver medal at the 1956 Melbourne Olympics competing for the United States.

    After retirement, he became an author, chaired the New York State Athletic Commission in the 1980s and served as supervisor for the World Boxing Organization.

    Ortiz says Torres will be buried Thursday in Ponce.

  3. #3
    Registered User
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Posts
    289
    vCash
    500

    Re: R.I.P - Jose Torres

    R.I.P. Champ.

  4. #4
    MANAGING EDITOR-IN-CHIEF
    Join Date
    Mar 2006
    Location
    In an undisclosed bunker deep in the weird, wild, woods of the Pacific Northwest
    Posts
    11,450
    vCash
    500

    Re: R.I.P - Jose Torres

    Jose "Chegui" Torres Career Record
    (Jose Luis Torres)

    BORN May 3 1936; Playa Ponce, Puerto Rico
    HEIGHT 5-10 (Some sources report 5-8)
    WEIGHT 158 1/2 - 182 lbs
    MANAGER Cus D'Amato
    TRAINER Joey Fariello
    Torres was a strong, tough battler who came to fight; A very strong hitter, he could dish it out and take it too; During his career, he won the Light Heavyweight Championship of the World

    He defeated such men as Willie Pastrano, Carl "Bobo" Olson, Eddie Cotton, Don Fullmer, Randy Sandy, Wayne Thornton, Tom McNeeley, Benny "Kid" Paret, Charles "Chic" Calderwood, Gomeo Brennan and Al Andrews

    Among his activities following his retirement from the ring, Torres gained fame as a writer, author and speaker, served as Commissioner of the New York State Athletic Commission from 1983 to 1985, served as Chairman of the New York State Athletic Commission from 1985 to 1988 and served as President/Supervisor of the World Boxing Organization from 1990 to 1995

    Jose was inducted into the World Boxing Hall of Fame in 1994 and the International Boxing Hall of Fame in 1997

    *** SOME AMATEUR BOUTS ***

    1956
    Peter Read Melbourne, Vic, Aus W 3
    Franco Scisciani Melbourne, Vic, Aus W 3
    John McCormack Melbourne, Vic, Aus W 3
    Laslo Papp Melbourne, Vic, Aus L 3
    -The previous 4 bouts were held as part of the Olympic
    Games Light Middleweight Competition; Torres won the
    Silver Medal

    -Torres won the Inter-City Golden Glove Championship

    1958
    -Torres won the New York Golden Gloves 160 lb Open Championship

    -Torres won the National AAU Middleweight Championship


    *** PROFESSIONAL BOUTS ***

    1958
    May 24 Gene Hamilton New York, NY KO 1
    Jun 7 Walter Irby New York, NY W 6
    Jun 21 Joe Salvato New York, NY KO 4
    Jul 5 Wes Lowery New York, NY W 6
    Aug 18 Benny Doyle Los Angeles, Ca KO 1
    Sep 29 Otis Woodward New York, NY KO 5
    Oct 13 Frankie Anselm New York, NY KO 9
    Nov 3 Burke Emery New York, NY KO 5
    Dec 4 Ike Jenkins New York, NY KO 5

    1959
    Feb 26 Eddie Wright New York, NY KO 5
    Mar 19 Leroy Oliphant New York, NY KO 3
    Apr 23 Joe Shaw New York, NY KO 5
    Jun 27 Al Andrews New York, NY KO 6
    Sep 26 Benny "Kid" Paret San Juan, Puerto Rico D 10

    1960
    Jan 30 Randy Sandy Elizabeth, NJ W 10
    Mar 15 Tony Dupas Buffalo, NY W 10
    Jun 11 Randy Sandy New York, NY W 10

    1961
    Feb 17 Gene Hamilton Ponce, Puerto Rico KO 4
    Apr 1 Bobby Barnes Paterson, NJ KO 3
    May 23 Bob Young Boston, Ma KO 5
    Jun 5 Mel Collins Boston, Ma KO 7
    Jun 27 Ike White Boston, Ma KO 3
    Oct 31 George Price Houston, Tx KO 2
    Nov 28 Tony Montano Houston, Tx KO 4

    1962
    Apr 10 Jimmy Watkins Utica, NY KO 7
    Jul 27 Obdulio Nunez San Juan, Puerto Rico KO 7
    Dec 14 Al Hauser Boston, Ma KO 3

    1963
    May 26 Florentino Fernandez San Juan, Puerto Rico LK 5
    Oct 9 Don Fullmer Teaneck, NJ W 10

    1964
    Jan 3 Jose Gonzalez New York, NY W 10
    Apr 21 Walker Simmons New York, NY KO 8
    May 15 Wilbert McClure New York, NY W 10
    Jun 22 Frankie Olivera New Bedford, Ct KO 5
    Jul 20 Walker Simmons New Bedford, Ct KO 6
    Sep 4 Gomeo Brennan Miami Beach, Fl W 10
    Nov 27 Carl "Bobo" Olson New York, NY KO 1

    1965
    Mar 30 Willie Pastrano New York, NY KO 9
    -WBC Light Heavyweight Championship of the World;
    WBA Light Heavyweight Championship of the World
    Jul 31 Tom McNeeley San Juan, Puerto Rico W 10

    1966
    May 21 Wayne Thornton Flushing, NY W 15
    -WBC Light Heavyweight Championship of the World;
    WBA Light Heavyweight Championship of the World
    Aug 15 Eddie Cotton Las Vegas, Nv W 15
    -WBC Light Heavyweight Championship of the World;
    WBA Light Heavyweight Championship of the World
    Oct 15 Charles "Chic" Calderwood San Juan, Puerto Rico KO 2
    -WBC Light Heavyweight Championship of the World;
    WBA Light Heavyweight Championship of the World
    Dec 16 Dick Tiger New York, NY L 15
    -WBC Light Heavyweight Championship of the World;
    WBA Light Heavyweight Championship of the World

    1967
    May 16 Dick Tiger New York, NY L 15
    -WBC Light Heavyweight Championship of the World;
    WBA Light Heavyweight Championship of the World

    1968
    Apr 1 Bob Dunlop Sydney, NSW, Australia KO 6

    1969
    Jul 14 Charley "Devil" Green New York, NY KO 2


    *** Assistance Provided By Seth Callis ***
    Record courtesy of Tracy Callis, Historian, International Boxing Research Organization

  5. #5
    Registered User
    Join Date
    Mar 2006
    Location
    In the Barrio, In La Puente,Ca.
    Posts
    12,026
    vCash
    500

    Re: R.I.P - Jose Torres

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=u5CyqzA7AH0
    Jose Torres vs Carl Bobo Olson

  6. #6
    Registered User
    Join Date
    Mar 2006
    Location
    In the Barrio, In La Puente,Ca.
    Posts
    12,026
    vCash
    500

    Re: R.I.P - Jose Torres

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FldIGvKNRPc
    Jose Torres vs Willie Pastrano

  7. #7
    Administrator
    Join Date
    Mar 2006
    Posts
    1,358
    vCash
    500

    Re: R.I.P - Jose Torres

    From WAIL! --

    An Interview with 1997 International Boxing Hall of Fame Inductee: Jose Torres
    By: David Iamele

    http://www.cyberboxingzone.com/boxin...-97.htm#torres

  8. #8
    Registered User
    Join Date
    Mar 2006
    Location
    In the Barrio, In La Puente,Ca.
    Posts
    12,026
    vCash
    500

    Re: R.I.P - Jose Torres

    Jose Torres dies at 72; former light heavyweight world champion

    By Associated Press
    January 19, 2009

    Reporting from Ponce, Puerto Rico -- Jose Torres, a former light heavyweight world champion and Olympic silver medalist, died Monday of a heart attack at his home in Ponce, Puerto Rico, according to his wife, Ramonita. He was 72.

    Torres won the light heavyweight title in 1965 by stopping Willie Pastrano at Madison Square Garden in New York. He made three title defenses before losing a close decision to Dick Tiger in 1966. He finished with a record of 41-3-1, with 29 knockouts.

    The mayor of Ponce, on the island's southern coast, declared three days of mourning and ordered flags be flown at half-staff.

    "Puerto Rico has lost a great Puerto Rican, a very valiant person who aside from being a great athlete, was a great human being," David Bernier, president of the U.S. territory's Olympic committee, told radio station WKAQ.

    A native of Ponce, Torres was born May 3, 1936. He began fighting when he joined the U.S. Army boxing team as a teenager to avoid KP duty. He won a silver medal as a light middleweight at the 1956 Melbourne Olympics while competing for the United States. He lost the title bout to Hungary's Laszlo Papp.

    He debuted in 1958 with a first round knockout of George Hamilton in New York. He won his next 12 fights, 10 by knockout.

    After retiring in 1969, he worked for several years as an aide to Paul O'Dwyer, who was then president of the New York City Council. He later worked for Andrew Stein, the borough president of Manhattan. He also was Puerto Rico's official representative in New York City.

    Torres chaired the New York State Athletic Commission in the 1980s and served as supervisor for the World Boxing Organization.

    In the 1990s, he fueled controversy while an aide to Mayor David N. Dinkins when he said that then-mayoral candidate Rudolph Giuliani appealed to the Ku Klux Klan.

    Early in his career, he became friendly with several well-known writers, including Pete Hamill, who at the time wrote for the New York Post. With Hamill's help, Torres got a column in the Post that mostly dealt with Latino community affairs. Years later, Norman Mailer helped Torres write a book on Muhammad Ali, called "Sting Like a Bee." For several years, Torres would spar three rounds with the older Mailer.

    Torres later wrote "Fire and Fear," a book on Mike Tyson, and for a time was a regular columnist for El Diario La Prensa, a Spanish-language newspaper in New York.

    He was inducted into the International Boxing Hall of Fame in 1997.

    Torres will be buried Thursday in Ponce.

    news.obits@latimes.com

  9. #9
    Registered User
    Join Date
    Aug 2006
    Location
    Long Island, NY
    Posts
    358
    vCash
    500

    Re: R.I.P - Jose Torres

    When I received the news Monday morning from Henry Hascup via text message, I gasped.

    "R.I.P.--Jose Torres"
    In the last few weeks, I have received at least three similar texts. First there was Rhonda Chase-Utley's mom. Then it was Howie Albert. Now, Jose Torres.

    Ms. Utley, who was a major part of the New Jersey State Athletic Control Board during the "Larry Hazzard Years," was extremely close with her mom and took the loss hard. I felt for her deeply, having lost my own mom last July.

    Howie Albert was a man who loved boxing with everyything inside him. Only days before his death, he attended the Ring 8 Holiday Party, so he could be with people he loved--boxing people. Included among those boxing people that day were his best friend, Gil Clancy, and the fighter he and Gil managed and trained throughout a Hall-of-Fame career, Emile Griffith. It's sad, but there are just not enough Howie Alberts in this world.

    Jose Torres was a serviceman...an Olympic medalist...a world champion boxer...a writer...an author...a state commissioner...and a positive spokesman for a sport which could use a lot more of the positive energy Torres brought to an arena or to a piece of paper with his words. Torres was also the man I replaced as Chairman of the New York State Athletic Commission in 1988.

    When Gov. Mario Cuomo had decided it would be me who replaced Torres, freeing Torres to finish writing "Fire and Fear," the biography of young Mike Tyson, I received a call from the outgoing Chairman.

    "I hear you've been chosen to take over the reigns of the New York State Athletic Commission," Torres said. "I want to wish you the best and to tell you to call me any time you want. Then he proceeded to give me a rundown of the staff and pointed out who was who. He told me who I could trust at the commission and who I couldn't trust. He warned me of one person in particular. Torres could not have been more on target. I eventually fired that person. The next day, Torres called.

    "You did the commission and boxing a big service by getting rid of that guy," said Torres. "He was a cancer to both, and you removed the cancer."

    But even before our days at the NYSAC, I had struck up a friendship with Torres. During my years at The Ring, Torres penned several stories for the magazine. He was both gracious and appreciative as I edited his stories. At lunch, he was never without an entertaining story or for giving me advice.

    I saw him a few months ago while he was in New York, and I thought he looked ill. Not wanting to say anything like that, I said, "You always look like you're ready to go 15 rounds." He just looked at me and shook his head.

    "You have never lied to me, Randy," he said softly. "Don't lie to me now." He just looked at me. He didn't need to say any more.

    Yes, I lied to him, then. He looked sick, weak and frail. I could see he wasn't well. So I lied to him.

    But I'm not lying now. I loved Jose Torres. I loved him for the man I knew him to be and for the man he showed to the world. I loved him for the way he treated people. I loved how he loved boxing. I loved his boyish enthusiasm. He was a special man. I wish he could have seen Barack Obama sworn in as our President. I know he would have been proud.

    I can speak only for myself, but I know that i guys like Muhammad Ali, Bert Sugar, Norman Mailer, Ryan O'Neil and others will say they feel the same as me when I tell you that, from the bottom of my heart, I am proud to have known Jose Torres.

    -Randy G.

  10. #10
    Registered User
    Join Date
    Mar 2006
    Posts
    1,404
    vCash
    500

    Re: R.I.P - Jose Torres

    Touching post Randy.

    Vale' and RIP champion.

  11. #11
    Registered User
    Join Date
    Mar 2006
    Posts
    686
    vCash
    500

    Re: R.I.P - Jose Torres

    R.I.P. Chegui.

  12. #12
    Registered User
    Join Date
    Mar 2006
    Location
    New York
    Posts
    2,468
    vCash
    500

    Re: R.I.P - Jose Torres

    I found out about this about 15 minutes ago today Monday Jan 20th. I am still stunned. I had been friends with Chegui and Ramona since the 60's. I spoke with him about a month ago after I sent him copies of his Olympic program and his fights up to the one with Lazlo Papp. We talked for about an hour every couple of months.

    Chegui is the perfect example of everything a man would ever want or hope to be, a powerful pro athlete, a brilliant man of culture in all ways who had an understanding of the world like few did. He retained the razor sharp street smarts of his youth tempered with the vast wisdom of an experienced man of many talents. His sense of humor, devoted love for his family made him a pleasure to be around.

    I consider myself lucky to have traveled with him and talked boxing with him until the sun came up hundreds of times. He told me stories of him boxing with Sugar Ray Robinson, Floyd Patterson and other greats moments not widely known. He witnessed some unbelievable fights in the service between Rubin Carter and Chico Rollins and so many others we talked about.

    My deepest wishes of love go out to his beloved wife Ramona Torres who remained his most loyal and closest life's companion. I will miss him always.

  13. #13
    Registered User
    Join Date
    Mar 2006
    Location
    New York
    Posts
    2,468
    vCash
    500

    Re: R.I.P - Jose Torres

    I just spoke to Jose Torres' son in Puerto Rico, who is helping his Mother through this ordeal. The hundreds of people who have called to express their love for his father has helped to comfort him tremendously through this painful time. He said Jose had gone to a baseball game earlier in the day and was fine. He had come home and rested and asked his wife for a cup of tea. When she returned, he was gone, and had passed peacefully.
    What a great gentleman, champion, husband, father and friend.

  14. #14
    MANAGING EDITOR-IN-CHIEF
    Join Date
    Mar 2006
    Location
    In an undisclosed bunker deep in the weird, wild, woods of the Pacific Northwest
    Posts
    11,450
    vCash
    500

    Re: R.I.P - Jose Torres

    JOSE TORRES EULOGY BY BILL GALLO


    A fine fighter and fellow, Jose Torres won a title and lots of friends

    BY BILL GALLO
    DAILY NEWS SPORTS WRITER





    Monday in Ponce, Puerto Rico, boxing lost a champion and one of its fine ambassadors. And I lost a friend.

    Jose Torres, better known by his friends as "Chegui," died of a heart attack. He was 72. The generous and fighting heart of this popular man gave out at his home with his wife of 48 years, Ramonita, by his side.

    Chegui was a good and solid boxer/puncher who had a total of 45 bouts, winning 41 of them, 12 by decision and 29 by knockout. Trained and managed by the savvy Cus D'Amato, Jose went on to win the light-heavyweight championship in 1965 when he stopped Willie Pastrano in nine rounds at Madison Square Garden.

    D'Amato knew his onions about the talents of fighters, not only guiding Torres to a crown but Floyd Patterson and Mike Tyson as well.

    D'Amato had his keen eye on Torres after seeing him win a silver medal in the 1956 Olympics. He immediately took him on and said, "This kid will be a champion, and it won't take that long."

    The first thing D'Amato did was put Torres in the same peekaboo style he started all his fighters on. To some, this was an awkward way to fight, but Cus defended it by saying that it worked fine for Patterson, who had gained the heavyweight championship that way. Well, it also worked for Torres.

    So, from the start in 1958 when he became a pro, Torres peekaboo'd his way through 28 fights, winning 27 of them with one draw.

    Torres then ran into the hard-hitting Florentino Fernandez, who in 1963 knocked him out in five. It was the only time Torres was KO'd.

    Not discouraged by the setback, Chegui bounced back, winning a decision against Don Fullmer a few fights before he knocked out Carl (Bobo) Olson in the first round.

    Before Torres even thought of hanging them up, he wanted one big money score, so he challenged, of all people, Muhammad Ali.

    It was at a boxing luncheon when we all were interviewing Ali that 5-10 Jose Torres went up to 6-3 Muhammad Ali and said, "C'mon man, you and me, I need a good payday. We'll pack them in."

    Ali didn't answer but he turned to Jose's wife and said, "Okay, but you have to feed him a lot of rice and beans. Only then can I make money for your man."

    Torres never did fight Ali. But he was a smart man who could write as well as most sports writers of his day. Pete Hamill, the splendid newspaper guy and fine author, guided him with pointers on style and said this about his good friend: "It didn't take long before Chegui could write, and write very well."

    Torres said that his biggest obstacle was learning to think in English. But the author Bert Sugar, who co-authored the Ali book "Sting Like A Bee" with him, said, "He was a damn good writer in two languages."

    The champ enjoyed the literary crowd and became good friends not only with Pete and Denis Hamill but with Norman Mailer and Budd Schulberg. He also befriended Robert Kennedy.

    He was smart, this friend of the boxing and newspaper world, and there was nobody I would rather talk boxing with than Jose. He spoke eloquently about this hard and sometimes brutal sport as if he were describing a painting of great merit. "Boxing indeed can be an art," he'd say.

    I remember how I learned that Torres was one of the smarter fighters of his day. Unlike a lot of others, he knew when to quit and it had much to do with a journeyman fighter named Charley (Devil) Green. Here's the story:

    It was in 1969 and Torres was weighing in for a fight with Jimmy Ralston, an upstate light-heavy. The fight was at the Garden and Jose was hoping for one more shot at the title he had lost to Dick Tiger.

    Then a dilemma - Ralston cops out of the fight and leaves matchmaker Teddy Brenner hanging. Teddy, in a panic, goes for a walk around the Garden. There on the street he spots Devil Green, a former sparring partner for Torres.

    "I'll give you $3,500 to fight Torres tonight," says Brenner.

    "Sure," says Green. "It's more than I could make shooting craps."

    The bell rings and Jose, expecting an easy night, gets clocked on the chin and if it weren't for the bell to save him, he would have been knocked out. Torres comes out in the second round and knocks out Green.

    In the dressing room, Torres tells us that he has just hung up his gloves forever. His parting words to boxing were: "When my sparring partner comes close to knocking me out, it's time to quit."

    This was Jose Torres - a good fellow, good fighter, popular man who commanded the attention of fighters and writers alike, a damn smart guy who knew both games and was a plus in our world.

    S'long, my friend. You did splendidly.

  15. #15
    Registered User
    Join Date
    Mar 2006
    Location
    London, England
    Posts
    371
    vCash
    500

    Re: R.I.P - Jose Torres

    I remember him as warm-hearted and generous. He would always talk to me during the conversations we had over the Dick Tiger story as though I was a confidant of his. It was no trouble for him to get you in touch with Bert Sugar or this or that guy at Ring 8.

    I met him once -in 1998- in London when he came along with Emile Griffith, Carlos Ortiz and Juan La Porte under the auspices of Ring 8. Although, I did not initiate the request, he tried to persuade Howie Albert to give me a free ticket for an impending boxing banquet (we met at a Boxing Memorabilia Fayre) but it was turned down. It's the gesture that counts.

    An interesting thing happened at the Fayre. I purchased an old Ring magazine from either the 70s or 80s and it had his picture in it. I got him to sign his name across part of his image but the article and the picture intrigued him so much, that he asked me to lend it to him for a while and I left him intently reading the story.

    Although we continued having the occasional chat after that, I didn't bother asking him for it before I departed.

    May his soul rest in peace.

  16. #16
    Registered User
    Join Date
    Mar 2006
    Location
    New York
    Posts
    2,468
    vCash
    500

    Re: R.I.P - Jose Torres

    Nice stuff Ade,

    I loved Jose and he let me call him anytime, any hour and he always talked with me for as long as it took. A wealth of stories and background on boxing.

    What a loss of such a beautiful person. Such a good husband, such a good wife and family. The loss of a Lion.

+ Reply to Thread

Similar Threads

  1. History of California Boxing in Photos
    By kikibalt in forum History of California Boxing
    Replies: 2059
    Last Post: 01-02-2013, 10:14 AM
  2. Jose Gonzalez
    By Counter Jab in forum Old-Timers
    Replies: 3
    Last Post: 10-24-2007, 11:27 AM
  3. Holt vs. Torres: "Chaos in Colombia"
    By Rafael in forum Modern
    Replies: 6
    Last Post: 09-04-2007, 06:37 PM
  4. HBO's Ray Torres' Dream Come True
    By GorDoom in forum Modern
    Replies: 12
    Last Post: 08-19-2006, 07:51 AM

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
News Current Champs WAIL! Encyclopedia Links Home